We often receive questions about Shipping & Handling charges. For those who had not understood all that “shipping & handling” signifies, the handling charge is all that transpires prior to the actual shipping of a box. The handling part of the shipping process is far more time consuming and labor intensive than many realize. If interested please take a moment to consider the following components of all required to get a box of plants into the hands of the customer... The steps are these:

Day 1:

A master list of all plants is formulated for that week's shipping event, each group organized under the respective customer's name and the state to which the order is to be shipped.

A shipping packet is created containing a copy of each order which may include special notes and cultural information.

New, clean name tags are made for each plant.

Using the master list all plants are then pulled from respective growing areas and corralled together in a place adjacent to where they will eventually be boxed.

Plants are tape-measured to determine box size for each order which is written on the master sheet.

Plants are then thoroughly watered (unless they are pads of cacti which had been cut from stands in the garden in which they grow.)

Appropriate boxes are pulled from dry storage.

Boxes are formed, bottoms taped shut and then each is addressed. Boxes are collected and set aside.

Day 2:

Boxes are transported to our present packing and boxing area.

Each plant is individually cleaned with name tags at the ready. If extra water is required those plants are watered at this time. Once perennials are cleaned they are newly tagged.

Plants requiring bare rooting are taken to a “wet” area where all soil is washed away, returned to the boxing area, packed, tagged and bagged.

Root balls on woodies are lifted and placed in plastic bags, tagged and bags are tied around the crowns of the plants.

Tall, wide-branched stems on woodies are reigned in with cord.

Perennials are topped-off with newspaper to hold soil in place. Elastic bands are set to hold paper tight to soil. Perennials are most usually wrapped and encircled with sheets of newspaper.

Shipping packets are set in their respective box.

Plants are then boxed with special attention and care to hold them in place – sometimes not pretty when one opens a box but utilitarian in fervent attempt to protect your plants from shipping agents who may not have heart in their work. It is imperative from our perspective that your plants arrive at your doorstep in very good condition.

Orders are double-checked for accuracy.

Boxes are then taped shut and moved to a shady area prior to actual shipping. Priority mail tape is then applied to boxes to larger brown boxes to immediately tip-off USPS workers as to the priority status of your order.

Separate is the time spent in office collecting, duplicating, collating and filing order copies prior to creating shipping packets. And at the time of shipping correlated email notification is transmitted or phone calls must be made when emails are kicked back to us.

Handling is all very much more time consuming than many people realize unless they have been immersed in the nuts and bolts of it. If approximately 13 boxes of mixed sizes and contents go out in a given week you are looking at a total of about 16 hours for that single shipping event with the actual work of packing and boxing plants usually requiring 2 individuals. You can see that these costs add up. And these costs are not part of the price of the plant which is a completely separate set of calculations.

We at Quackin' Grass want to thank you for your patience, placing your faith in us and working with us while we go through growing pains. We genuinely appreciate your business and understanding of all that is required to provide you with a high quality product and standard of service. Thank you for your kindness and consideration. And please remember the golden rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.