Click for previous Image Image 1 of 4 Osmanthus heterophyllus Holly Tea Olive

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Goshiki'

Holly Tea Olive

Plant Type:

BROADLEAF EVERGREEN SHRUBS

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Goshiki' - New leaves are pink to pink-red. As they expand streaks of creamy white appear on green and then they mature white over a gray-green background. Leaves resemble those of hollies but this is actually an olive relative. White flowers though not significant are fragrant. 'Goshiki', a broad leaf evergreen, will form a low, mounding shrub of great beauty in the foundation, as a filler among taller background deciduous shrubs and evergreens - coniferous or otherwise, or as a distinctive low hedge. It's beautiful! We planted a pair along our south foundation. They are very much alive and growing after a number of years having come through every kind of weird, variable winter that we have experienced. But, truthfully, they are clinging to the side of the house almost like "self-espaliers". You can almost feel them cringing away from the winter cold pressing themselves up against the house... But they don't seem to be suffering and it is kinda funny. And we love them. Site in full to nearly full sun planted in fertile, draining soil. Cutting grown.


 


Height:

4-10 ft

Spread:

4-10 ft

Colors:

White

Zone:

(6)7 to 9
What is my hardiness zone?
Item Description Price  
OSMHEGO Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Goshiki' (5 inch Square x 6 inch Tall - 2 quarts / 1.8927 liters) $24.00 Buy Now


Characteristics and Attributes for Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Goshiki'

Season of Interest (Flowering)

  • Autumn

Season of Interest (Foliage)

  • Four Seasons

Autumn Interest

  • Fruit / Berries / Seed Heads

Nature Attraction

  • Honey Bees & Native Bees

Light

  • Full Sun
  • Mostly Sunny

Attributes

  • Border
  • Specimen
  • Foundation
  • Drought Tolerant
  • Potted Plant
  • Screen
  • Edging
  • Accent
  • Labyrinth
  • Evergreen
  • Shrub Border
  • Fragrant

Growth Rate in the Garden

  • Medium

Soil

  • Fertile
  • Draining

Origins

  • Japan

Propagated By

  • Cutting Grown